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Theragatha

Theragāthā 15.1
The Verses of Arahant Aññākoṇḍañña (673-688)

673. This Dhamma has a wonderful taste. When I heard that excellent Dhamma, I gained great confidence in it. This Dhamma taught by the Supreme Buddha is a passion-free teaching that leads to complete detachment.

674. There are various objects in this world. I think that the thoughts connected with these colorful objects arousing lust, stir up the whole world.

675. Just as dust blown by the wind settles when it rains, so lustful thoughts fade away when one understands them with wisdom.

676. With developed wisdom, when one contemplates all conditioned things as impermanent, he becomes disenchanted with suffering. This is the way to purification.

677. With developed wisdom, when one contemplates all conditioned things as suffering, he becomes disenchanted with suffering. This is the way to purification.

678. With developed wisdom, when one contemplates all phenomena as non-self, he becomes disenchanted with suffering. This is the way to purification.

679. This elder Koṇḍañña followed the Buddha very closely. This monk is strong in energy. That is why he could eliminate birth and death. He perfected living the holy life.

680. There is a huge flood. There are snares everywhere. There are strong spears and there is a mountain hard to split. This elder broke all the spears, destroyed all the snares and split into pieces the mountain that was hard to split. He crossed over the flood and reached the far shore. He is a meditator. He is released from the bond of Māra.

681. If a monk is conceited, vain, and delights in the association of evil friends, he will sink down into the whirlpool called anger and drown in the great flood of saṁsāra.

682. The wise monk who is not conceited, not vain, and who acts prudently, restraining sense bases, and associating with noble friends, will put an end to suffering.

683. His hands and legs are very thin like the knots of the kāla plant. His veins are popping out. He knows very well the purpose of taking food. He has a strong, brave heart.

684. He goes to the thick forest to meditate. There, when he is attacked by mosquitos and harmful insects, he endures them with clear mindfulness, like a king elephant in the battlefield.

685. I don’t desire death nor do I desire life. Like a person who is awaiting his monthly salary, I am awaiting my time to attain final Nibbāna at passing away.

686. I don’t desire death nor do I desire life. With clear mindfulness and awareness, I am awaiting the day to attain final Nibbāna at passing away.

687. The Great Teacher’s instruction has been respectfully followed by me. The Buddha’s path has been fully followed by me. I lowered the heavy load of defilements. I rooted out the fetters of existence.

688. I became a monk with the wish to achieve one goal. That, I have achieved. So, what do I need anyone else for? (I am liberated from everything.)

These verses were said by Arahant Aññākoṇḍañña.

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Theragāthā 15.1: The Verses of Arahant Aññākoṇḍañña (673-688)

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