Categories
Anguttara Nikaya

Aṅguttara Nikāya
1.296–1.377
One Thing

Some things in life are very powerful.

AN 1.296

“Monks, when one thing is developed and cultivated, it leads exclusively to disenchantment, dispassion, cessation, peace, insight, enlightenment, and Nibbana. What one thing? Recollection of the Buddha. This one thing, when developed and cultivated, leads exclusively to disenchantment, dispassion, cessation, peace, insight, enlightenment, and Nibbana.”

AN 1.297–305

“Monks, when one thing is developed and cultivated, it leads exclusively to disenchantment, dispassion, cessation, peace, insight, enlightenment, and Nibbana. What one thing? Recollection of the Dhamma … Recollection of the Saṅgha … Recollection of one’s virtue … Recollection of one’s generosity … Recollection of the deities … Mindfulness of breathing … Mindfulness of death … Mindfulness of the body … Recollection of inner peace due to the absence of taints. This one thing, when developed and cultivated, leads exclusively to disenchantment, dispassion, cessation, peace, insight, enlightenment, and Nibbana.”

AN 1.306

“Monks, I do not see a single thing that gives rise to unwholesome qualities like wrong view. Also, I do not see a single thing, when unwholesome qualities have arisen, makes them increase and grow, like wrong view. When you have wrong view, unwholesome qualities arise and once arisen, they grow.”

AN 1.307

“Monks, I do not see a single thing that gives rise to wholesome qualities like right view. Also, I do not see a single thing, when wholesome qualities have arisen, that makes them increase and grow, like right view. When you have right view, unarisen wholesome qualities arise and unwholesome qualities decline.”

AN 1.308

“Monks, I do not see a single thing that gives rise to unwholesome qualities, or makes wholesome qualities decline like wrong view. When you have wrong view, unwholesome qualities arise and wholesome qualities decline.”

AN 1.309

“Monks, I do not see a single thing that gives rise to wholesome qualities, or makes unwholesome qualities decline, like right view. When you have right view, wholesome qualities arise and unwholesome qualities decline.”

AN 1.310

“Monks, I do not see a single thing that gives rise to wrong view like unwise attention. Also, I do not see a single thing, once wrong view has arisen, makes it grow, like unwise attention. When you attend unwisely, wrong view arises, and once arisen, it grows.”

AN 1.311

“Monks, I do not see a single thing that gives rise to right view like wise attention. Also, I do not see a single thing, once right view has arisen, makes it grow, like wise attention. When you attend wisely, right view arises, and once arisen, it grows.”

AN 1.312

“Monks, I do not see a single thing that causes beings to be reborn after death, in a miserable, painful, lower world—such as hell—like wrong view. It is because they have wrong view that beings, after death, are reborn in a miserable, painful, lower world, such as hell.”

AN 1.313

“Monks, I do not see a single thing that causes beings to be reborn after death, in a happy place such as a heavenly world, like right view. It is because they have right view that beings, after death, are reborn in a happy place such as a heavenly world.”

AN 1.314

“Monks, when an individual has wrong view, whatever bodily, verbal, or mental deeds he does in line with that wrong view, whatever intention, aim, wish, and choice he has, all of them lead to what is unlikable, undesirable, disagreeable, harmful, and to suffering. Why is that? Because his view is evil. Suppose a seed of neem, angled gourd, or bitter gourd was planted in moist earth. Whatever nutrients it takes up from the earth and water would lead to its bitter, acidic, and unpleasant taste. Why is that? Because those seeds are bitter. In the same way, when an individual has wrong view, whatever bodily, verbal, or mental deeds he does in line with that wrong view, whatever intention, aim, wish, and choice he has, all of them lead to what is unlikable, undesirable, disagreeable, harmful, and to suffering. Why is that? Because his view is evil.”

AN 1.315

“Monks, when an individual has right view, whatever bodily, verbal, or mental deeds he does in line with that right view, whatever intention, aim, wish, and choice he has, all of them lead to what is likable, desirable, agreeable, beneficial, and pleasant. Why is that? Because his view is right. Suppose a seed of sugar cane, fine rice, or grape was planted in the moist earth. Whatever nutrients it takes up from the earth and water, would lead to its sweet, pleasant, and delicious taste. Why is that? Because those seeds are not bitter. In the same way, when an individual has right view, whatever bodily, verbal, or mental deeds he does in line with that right view, whatever intention, aim, wish, and choice he has, all of them lead to what is likable, desirable, agreeable, beneficial, and pleasant. Why is that? Because his view is right.”

AN 1.316

“Monks, a person is born in the world for harm, pain, and suffering of gods and humans. Which person? Someone with wrong view, whose vision of life is wrong. He draws many people away from the true teaching and establishes them in false teachings. This is the person who is born in the world for the harm, pain, and suffering of gods and humans.”

AN 1.317

“Monks, a person is born in the world for the benefit, welfare and happiness of gods and humans. Which person? Someone with right view, whose vision of life is right. He draws many people away from false teachings and establishes them in the true teaching. This is the person who is born in the world for the benefit, welfare, and happiness of gods and humans.”

AN 1.318

“Monks, I do not see a single thing that is as blameworthy as wrong view. Wrong view is the most blameworthy thing of all.”

AN 1.319

“Monks, I do not see a single other person who acts for the harm, pain and suffering of gods and humans like that silly man, Makkhali. Just as a trap set at the mouth of a river would bring harm, suffering, calamity, and disaster for many fish, so too, that silly man, Makkhali, is a trap for humans. He has arisen in the world for the harm, suffering, calamity, and disaster of many beings.”

AN 1.320

“Monks, the person who trains in a poorly explained teaching and also encourages someone to train in it, both make a lot of bad karma. Why is that? Because the teaching is poorly explained.”

AN 1.321

“Monks, the person who trains in a well explained teaching and also encourages someone to train in it, both make a lot of good karma. Why is that? Because the teaching is well explained.”

AN 1.322

“Monks, in a poorly-explained teaching and training, the donor should know the limit of giving, not the receiver. Why is that? Because the teaching is poorly explained.”

AN 1.323

“Monks, in a well-explained teaching and training, the receiver should know the limit of accepting, not the donor. Why is that? Because the teaching is well explained.”

AN 1.324

“Monks, in a poorly-explained teaching and training, an energetic person lives in suffering. Why is that? Because the teaching is poorly explained.”

AN 1.325

“Monks, in a well-explained teaching and training, a lazy person lives in suffering. Why is that? Because the teaching is well explained.”

AN 1.326

“Monks, in a poorly-explained teaching and training, a lazy person lives happily. Why is that? Because the teaching is poorly explained.”

AN 1.327

“Monks, in a well-explained teaching and training, an energetic person lives happily. Why is that? Because the teaching is well explained.”

AN 1.328

“Monks, just as even a tiny bit of excrement still stinks, so too, I don’t praise even a tiny bit of repeated existence, not even as long as a finger snap.”

AN 1.329–332

“Monks, just as even a tiny bit of urine, spit, pus, or blood still stinks, so too, I don’t praise even a tiny bit of repeated existence, not even as long as a finger snap.”

AN 1.333

“Monks, just as in India where the delightful parks, woods, meadows, and lotus ponds are few, while the hilly grounds, inaccessible lands, stumps and thorns, and rugged mountains are many; so too, the beings born on land are few, while those other beings born in water are many.

AN 1.334

… so too, the beings reborn as humans are few, while those other beings not reborn as humans are many. … so too, the beings reborn in the middle country1 are few, while those reborn in the faraway lands2, among dumb, uncultured people, are many.

AN 1.335

… so too, the beings who are wise, bright, clever, and able to distinguish what is well said3 from what is poorly said 4 are few, while the beings who are witless, dull, stupid, and unable to distinguish what is well said from what is poorly said are many.

AN 1.336

… so too, the beings who have the noble eye of wisdom are few, while those who are ignorant and confused are many.

AN 1.337

… so too, the beings who get to see a Fully Enlightened Buddha are few, while those who don’t get to see a Fully Enlightened Buddha are many.

AN 1.338

… so too, the beings who get to hear the teaching and training proclaimed by a Fully Enlightened Buddha are few, while those other beings who don’t get to hear the teaching and training proclaimed by a Fully Enlightened Buddha are many.

AN 1.339

… so too, the beings who remember the Dhamma teachings they hear are few, while those who don’t remember the Dhamma teachings they hear are many.

AN 1.340

… so too, the beings who examine the meaning of the Dhamma teachings they have memorized are few, while those who don’t examine the meaning of the Dhamma teachings they have memorized are many.

AN 1.341

… so too, the beings who understand the meaning and the teaching of the Dhamma and practice accordingly are few, while those who understand the meaning and the teaching of the Dhamma but don’t practice accordingly are many.

AN 1.342

… so too, the beings who witness problems of life and think seriously about a way out are few, while those who don’t think seriously about a way out are many.

AN 1.343

… so too, the beings after thinking seriously about the meaning of life, strive effectively to find the true meaning of life are few, while those who, even though touched by the problems of life, don’t strive a way out effectively are many.

AN 1.344

… so too, the beings who gain concentration, gain a unification of mind, aiming for Nibbana are few, while those who don’t gain concentration, don’t gain a unification of mind, aiming for Nibbana are many.

AN 1.345

… so too, the people who receive the best food and flavors are few, while those who don’t get the best food and flavors, but receive by begging are many.

AN 1.346

… so too, the beings who get to experience the meaning of the Dhamma, the teachings of the Dhamma, and the peace of Nibbana are few, while the beings who don’t get to experience the meaning of the Dhamma, the teachings of the Dhamma, and the peace of Nibbana are many. So you should train like this: ‘We will get to experience the meaning of Dhamma, the teaching of Dhamma, and the peace of Nibbana.’ That’s how you should train.”

AN 1.347–349

“Monks, just as in India where the delightful parks, woods, meadows, and lotus ponds are few, while the hilly grounds, inaccessible lands, stumps and thorns, and rugged mountains are many; so too, those humans who die and are reborn as humans are few, while those other humans who die and are reborn in hell, or in the animal world, or in the ghost world are many.”

AN 1.350–352

“… the humans who die and are reborn as gods are few, while those other humans who die and are reborn in hell, or in the animal world, or in the ghost world are many.”

AN 1.353–355

“… the gods who die and are reborn as gods are few, while those other gods who die and are reborn in hell, or in the animal world, or in the ghost world are many.”

AN 1.356–358

“… the gods who die and are reborn as humans are few, while those other gods who die and are reborn in hell, or in the animal world, or in the ghost world are many.”

AN 1.359–361

“… the hell beings who die and are reborn as humans are few, while those other hell beings who die and are reborn in hell, or in the animal world, or in the ghost world are many.”

AN 1.362–364

“… the hell beings who die and are reborn as gods are few, while those other hell beings who die and are reborn in hell, or in the animal world, or in the ghost world are many.”

AN 1.365–367

“… the animals who die and are reborn as humans are few, while those other animals who die and are reborn in hell, or in the animal world, or in the ghost world are many.”

AN 1.368–370

“… the animals who die and are reborn as gods are few, while those other animals who die and are reborn in hell, or in the animal world, or in the ghost world are many.”

AN 1.371–373

“… the ghosts who die and are reborn as humans are few, while those other ghosts who die and are reborn in hell, or in the animal world, or in the ghost world are many.”

AN 1.374–377

“… the ghosts who die and are reborn as gods are few, while the others ghosts who die and are reborn in hell, or in the animal world, or in the ghost world are many.”

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Aṅguttara Nikāya 1.296–1.377: One Thing

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