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Anguttara Nikaya

Aṅguttara Nikāya
1.394–1.574
Finger Snap

Even a small amount of meditation...

AN 1.394

“Monks, if a monk develops the first jhāna, even as long as a finger snap, he is called a monk who does not lack meditation, who follows the Buddha’s instructions, who responds to the Buddha’s advice, and who does not eat the people’s food in vain. How much more for those who practice it longer!”

AN 1.395–401

“Monks, if a monk develops the second … third … fourth jhāna … loving kindness … compassion … appreciative joy … equanimity, even as long as a finger snap, he is called a monk who does not lack meditation, who follows the Buddha’s instructions, who responds to the Buddha’s advice, and who does not eat the people’s food in vain. How much more for those who practice it longer!”

AN 1.402–405

If a monk meditates by observing the body … feelings … mind … wisdom factors, with keen effort, with wise awareness, and with mindfulness, overcoming greed and grief for the world, even for the time of a finger snap …

AN 1.406–409

If a monk generates enthusiasm, attempts, makes an effort, applies the mind, and strives hard so that unwholesome qualities don’t arise, even for the time of a finger snap …. If he generates enthusiasm, attempts, makes an effort, applies the mind, and strives hard so that unwholesome qualities that have arisen are given up, even for the time of a finger snap …. If he generates enthusiasm, attempts, makes an effort, applies the mind, and strives hard so that wholesome qualities that have not arisen do arise, even for the time of a finger snap …. If he generates enthusiasm, attempts, makes an effort, applies the mind, and strives hard so that wholesome qualities that have arisen remain, are not lost, but increase, mature, and are fulfilled by repeated practice, even for the time of a finger snap …

AN 1.410–413

If a monk develops the jhāna effortfully with the basis of psychic power that is based on enthusiasm for enlightenment … the jhāna effortfully with the basis of psychic power that is based on effort for enlightenment … the jhāna effortfully with the basis of psychic power that is based on determination for enlightenment … the jhāna effortfully with the basis of psychic power that is based on investigation for enlightenment, even for the time of a finger snap …

AN 1.414–418

If a monk develops the spiritual faculty of faith … the spiritual faculty of energy … the spiritual faculty of mindfulness … the spiritual faculty of concentration … the spiritual faculty of wisdom, even for the time of a finger snap …

AN 1.419–423

If a monk develops the power of faith … the power of energy … the power of mindfulness … the power of concentration … the power of wisdom, even for the time of a finger snap …

AN 1.424–430

If a monk develops the awakening factor of mindfulness … the awakening factor of investigation of Dhamma… the awakening factor of energy … the awakening factor of rapture … the awakening factor of tranquility … the awakening factor of concentration … the awakening factor of equanimity, even for the time of a finger snap …

AN 1.431–438

If a monk develops right view … right thought … right speech … right action … right livelihood … right effort … right mindfulness … right concentration, even for the time of a finger snap …

AN 1.439–446

Perceiving form internally, he sees visions externally, limited, both pretty and ugly. Having mastered this, he is aware that: ‘I know and see.’ … Perceiving form internally, he sees visions externally, limitless, both pretty and ugly. Having mastered this, he is aware that: ‘I know and see.’ … Not perceiving form internally, he sees visions externally, limited, both pretty and ugly. Having mastered this, he is aware that: ‘I know and see.’ … Not perceiving form internally, he sees visions externally, limitless, both pretty and ugly. Having mastered this, he is aware that: ‘I know and see.’ … Not perceiving form internally, he sees visions externally that are blue, with blue color, blue hue, and blue tint. Having mastered this, he is aware that: ‘I know and see.’ … Not perceiving form internally, he sees visions externally that are yellow, with yellow color, yellow hue, and yellow tint. Having mastered this, he is aware that: ‘I know and see.’ … Not perceiving form internally, he sees visions externally that are red, with red color, red hue, and red tint. Having mastered this, he is aware that: ‘I know and see.’ … Not perceiving form internally, he sees visions externally that are white, with white color, white hue, and white tint. Having mastered this, he is aware that: ‘I know and see.’ …

AN 1.447–454

Having physical form, he sees visions … not perceiving form internally, he sees visions externally … they’re focused only on beauty … going totally beyond perceptions of form, with the ending of perceptions of impingement, not focusing on perceptions of diversity, aware that ‘space is infinite’, he enters and remains in the dimension of infinite space … going totally beyond the dimension of infinite space, aware that ‘consciousness is infinite’, he enters and remains in the dimension of infinite consciousness … going totally beyond the dimension of infinite consciousness, aware that ‘there is nothing at all’, he enters and remains in the dimension of nothingness … going totally beyond the dimension of nothingness, he enters and remains in the dimension of neither perception nor non-perception … going totally beyond the dimension of neither perception nor non-perception, he enters and remains in the cessation of perception and feeling …

AN 1.455–464

If a monk develops the meditation on the sign of earth … the meditation on the sign of water … the meditation on the sign of fire … the meditation on the sign of air … the meditation on the sign of blue … the meditation on the sign of yellow … the meditation on the sign of red … the meditation on the sign of white … the meditation on the sign of space … the meditation on the sign of consciousness …

AN 1.465–474

If a monk develops the perception of impurity of body … the perception of death … the perception of the repulsiveness of food … the perception of dissatisfaction with the whole world … the perception of impermanence … the perception of suffering in impermanence … the perception of not-self in suffering … the perception of abandonment … the perception of dispassion … the perception of cessation …

AN 1.475–484

If a monk develops the perception of impermanence … the perception of not-self … the perception of death … the perception of the repulsiveness of food … the perception of dissatisfaction with the whole world … the perception of a skeleton … the perception of a worm-infested corpse … the perception of a livid corpse … the perception of a corpse split open … the perception of a bloated corpse …

AN 1.485–494

If a monk develops the recollection of the Buddha … the recollection of the Dhamma … the recollection of the Saṅgha … the recollection of one’s virtue … the recollection of generosity … the recollection of the deities … mindfulness of breathing … the recollection of death … mindfulness of the body … the recollection of stilling of taints …

AN 1.495–534

If a monk develops the faculty of faith together with the first jhāna … the faculty of energy … the faculty of mindfulness … the faculty of concentration … the faculty of wisdom … the power of faith … the power of energy … the power of mindfulness … the power of concentration … the power of wisdom together with the first jhāna …

AN 1.535–574

Together with the second jhāna … the third jhāna … the fourth jhāna … loving kindness … compassion … appreciative joy … equanimity … the faculty of energy … the faculty of mindfulness … the faculty of concentration … the faculty of wisdom … the power of faith … the power of energy … the power of mindfulness … the power of concentration … the power of wisdom, even as long as a finger snap, he is called a monk who does not lack meditation, who follows the Buddha’s instructions, who responds to the Buddha’s advice, and who does not eat the people’s food in vain. How much more for those who practice it longer!”

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Aṅguttara Nikāya 1.394–1.574: Finger Snap

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