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Dhammapada

Dhammapada
21 Pakiṇṇaka Vagga
Miscellaneous (290-305)

Mattā­su­kha­paric­cāgā,
passe ce vipulaṃ sukhaṃ;
Caje mattāsukhaṃ dhīro,
sampassaṃ vipulaṃ sukhaṃ.

290. One who expects greater happiness must be able to give up lesser happiness. The wise person looking for the greater, Nibbāna, renounces the lesser, sense pleasures.

Para­duk­khū­pa­dhā­nena,
attano sukhamicchati;
Vera­saṃsag­ga­saṃsaṭ­ṭho,
verā so na parimuccati.

291. Those who seek their own happiness by causing suffering for others are entangled with hate. They will never be free from hate.

Yañhi kiccaṃ apaviddhaṃ,
akiccaṃ pana karīyati;
Unnaḷānaṃ pamattānaṃ,
tesaṃ vaḍḍhanti āsavā.

292. If someone rejects the Dhamma practice and does, instead, what they should not, impurities increase for that conceited and negligent person.

Yesañca susamāraddhā,
niccaṃ kāyagatā sati;
Akiccaṃ te na sevanti,
kicce sātaccakārino;
Satānaṃ sampajānānaṃ,
atthaṃ gacchanti āsavā.

293. If someone’s mind is constantly well established with mindfulness of the body and does not do what he should not do, impurities are destroyed for that mindful person with full awareness.

Mātaraṃ pitaraṃ hantvā,
rājāno dve ca khattiye;
Raṭṭhaṃ sānucaraṃ hantvā,
anīgho yāti brāhmaṇo.

294. Having killed with wisdom, the mother called craving, the father called arrogance, the two warrior kings called eternalism and nihilism; and having destroyed the country called the internal and external sense bases, together with its treasurer called desire, the brahmin, free of suffering, goes to Nibbāna.

Mātaraṃ pitaraṃ hantvā,
rājāno dve ca sotthiye;
Veyaggha­pañca­maṃ hantvā,
anīgho yāti brāhmaṇo.

295. Having killed, with wisdom, the mother called craving, the father called arrogance, the two brahmin’s kings called eternalism and nihilism, the tiger called the five hindrances, the brahmin—free of suffering—goes to Nibbāna.

Suppabuddhaṃ pabujjhanti,
sadā gotamasāvakā;
Yesaṃ divā ca ratto ca,
niccaṃ buddhagatā sati.

296. Those disciples of Gotama Buddha, who day and night constantly practice the meditation on the qualities of the Buddha, wake up happily every day.

Suppabuddhaṃ pabujjhanti,
sadā gotamasāvakā;
Yesaṃ divā ca ratto ca,
niccaṃ dhammagatā sati.

297. Those disciples of Gotama Buddha, who day and night constantly practice the meditation on the qualities of the Dhamma, wake up happily every day.

Suppabuddhaṃ pabujjhanti,
sadā gotamasāvakā;
Yesaṃ divā ca ratto ca,
niccaṃ saṅghagatā sati.

298. Those disciples of Gotama Buddha, who day and night constantly practice the meditation on the qualities of the community of noble monks, wake up happily every day.

Suppabuddhaṃ pabujjhanti,
sadā gotamasāvakā;
Yesaṃ divā ca ratto ca,
niccaṃ kāyagatā sati.

299. Those disciples of Gotama Buddha, who day and night constantly practice mindfulness of the body, wake up happily every day.

Suppabuddhaṃ pabujjhanti,
sadā gotamasāvakā;
Yesaṃ divā ca ratto ca,
ahiṃsāya rato mano.

300. Those disciples of Gotama Buddha, whose minds by day and night delight in harmlessness, wake up happily every day.

Suppabuddhaṃ pabujjhanti,
sadā gotamasāvakā;
Yesaṃ divā ca ratto ca,
bhāvanāya rato mano.

301. Those disciples of Gotama Buddha, whose minds by day and night delight in calm and insight meditation, wake up happily every day.

Duppabbajjaṃ durabhiramaṃ,
Durāvāsā gharā dukhā;
Duk­kho­sa­mānasaṃ­vāso,
Duk­khā­nu­patitad­dhagū;
Tasmā na caddhagū siyā,
Na cadukkhānupatitosiyā.

302. Becoming a monk is difficult—it is hard to enjoy the monk life. Household life is also difficult—it is painful. Living with people who have different opinions is suffering. Wandering in the journey of rebirths is indeed suffering. Therefore, do not be a wanderer in saṁsāra; do not be a pursuer of suffering.

Saddho sīlena sampanno,
yaso­bho­gasamap­pito;
Yaṃ yaṃ padesaṃ bhajati,
tattha tattheva pūjito.

303. The lay disciple of the Buddha—endowed with faith, virtue, fame, and wealth—is respected wherever he goes.

Dūre santo pakāsenti,
himavantova pabbato;
Asantettha na dissanti,
rattiṃ khittā yathā sarā.

304. Good people are seen from afar by the Buddha, like the Himalaya mountain is visible from afar. But foolish people are unseen, even close up, like arrows shot in the night.

Ekāsanaṃ ekaseyyaṃ,
eko caramatandito;
Eko damayamattānaṃ,
vanante ramito siyā.

305. One should live alone, one should sleep alone, and having tamed oneself alone without being lazy, one should live in the forest, delighting there.

Sādhu! Sādhu! Sādhu!

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Dhammapada 21 Pakiṇṇaka Vagga: Miscellaneous (290-305)

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