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Samyutta Nikaya
Sotāpatti Saṁyutta

55.42 Dutiya Asaṇkheyya Sutta
Incalculable 2

The Supreme Buddha explains how to create happiness.

“Monks, there are four kinds of streams of merit and streams of wholesomeness that generate happiness. What four? The first is when a noble disciple has unshakable confidence in the Buddha…This is the first kind of stream of merit and stream of wholesomeness that generates happiness. The second is when a noble disciple has unshakable confidence in the Dhamma… This is the second kind of stream of merit and stream of wholesomeness that generates happiness. The third is when a noble disciple has unshakable confidence in the Saṅgha… This is the third kind of stream of merit and stream of wholesomeness that generates happiness. The fourth is when a noble disciple lives at home rid of the stain of stinginess, ready to give, open-handed, with desire to give, committed to charity, loves to give and share. This is the fourth kind of stream of merit and stream of wholesomeness that generates happiness.

“These are the four kinds of streams of merit and streams of wholesomeness that generate happiness.

“When a noble disciple has these four kinds of streams of merit and streams of wholesomeness, it’s not easy to measure how much merit he has by saying, ’This is the amount of happiness generated by his stream of merit and stream of wholesomeness.’ His merit simply is incalculable, immeasurable and is vast.

“Monks, there are places where the great rivers—the Ganges, Yamuna, Aciravatī, Sarabhū, and Mahī—come together and meet. It’s not easy to measure how much water is in such places by saying how many bucketfuls, how many hundreds, thousands, hundreds of thousands of bucketful there are. It’s simply incalculable, immeasurable and a great mass of water.

“In the same way, when a noble disciple has these four kinds of streams of merit and streams of wholesomeness, it’s not easy to measure how much merit he has by saying, ’This is the amount of happiness generated by his stream of merit and stream of wholesomeness.’ His merit simply is incalculable, immeasurable and is vast.”

That is what the Buddha said. Then the Blessed One further said,

“The great ocean which holds a huge quantity of water,
is the home to many precious gems.
All the rivers that flow through villages
finally reach the great ocean which is deep and terrifying.

“So too, when a person gives food, drink, and clothes;
and he’s a giver of beds, seats, and mats—
the streams of merit reach that wise person,
just as the rivers bring their waters to the great ocean.”

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Saṁyutta Nikāya 55.42 Dutiya Asaṇkheyya Sutta: Incalculable 2

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