Categories
Anguttara Nikaya

AN 1.1-1.10: Sights, etc.

The Supreme Buddha taught that desire is the cause of suffering. What did he say that people desire?

AN 1.1 This is how I heard. At one time the Buddha was staying in the city of Sāvatthī in Jeta’s park, at Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. There, the Buddha addressed the monks, “Monks!” “Bhante,” they replied. The Buddha said this: “Monks, I do not see a single sight that obsesses a man’s mind like the sight […]

Categories
Itivuttaka

Itv 28 Pathama Bhikku Sutta: The Monk (1)

When a monk is not careful guarding their sense faculties and are immoderate in eating, it leads to suffering.

This discourse was taught by the Blessed One, taught by the Arahant, the fully enlightened Supreme Buddha. This is as I heard: “Monks, when endowed with two things, a monk suffers in this life, experiencing trouble, distress, and despair. At the breakup of the body, after death, the plane of misery is to be expected. […]

Categories
Itivuttaka

Itv 72 Nissaraniya Sutta: Escape

The Buddha explains the three elements of escape.

This discourse was taught by the Blessed One, taught by the Arahant, the fully enlightened Supreme Buddha. This is as I heard: “Monks, there are three elements of escape. What three? Renunciation, which is the escape from sense pleasures; the escape from forms and from the formless; and escape from whatever is born, conditioned, and […]

Categories
Itivuttaka

Itv 95 Kāmupapatti Sutta: Sense Pleasures

The Buddha explains three sense pleasures that can be obtained and how one must abandon them by understanding reality.

This discourse was taught by the Blessed One, taught by the Arahant, the fully enlightened Supreme Buddha. This is as I heard, “Monks, there are three sense pleasures that may be obtained. What three? Sense pleasures that are always present, sense pleasures of those who delight in creating pleasures (sense pleasures of Nimmānarati gods), and […]

Categories
Itivuttaka

Itv 96 Kāmayoga Sutta: The Bonds

The Buddha explains how one who is tied by the bond of sense pleasures will continue in this cycle of rebirth.

This discourse was taught by the Blessed One, taught by the Arahant, the fully enlightened Supreme Buddha. This is as I heard, “Monks, a person tied by the bond of sense desire and by the bond of existence is a returner, one who returns to this sense-world. Monks, a person freed from the bond of […]

Categories
Itivuttaka

Itv 109 Purusapiyarupa Sutta: Delightful Nature

The Buddha gives a beautiful simile to describe to abandon lust and to head towards Nibbāna.

If you wish to attain ultimate freedom, Nibbāna, the security from bondage, you should abandon sense desire, even if it is painful. Rightly comprehending with wisdom, with a mind that is well-liberated from defilements, one touches liberation now here, now there.

Categories
Itivuttaka

Itv 110 Cara Sutta: While Walking

The Buddha explains how energy must be roused to get rid of evil thoughts and overcome them.

“Monks, if while walking, a thought of sense desire or ill will or harmfulness arises in a monk, and if he allows it to stay and does not reject it, does not quickly abandon it, does not get rid of it, and does not bring it to an end, that monk— lacking in energy and unafraid of wrongdoing—is often and continually called lazy and weak in his effort.

Categories
Peta Vatthu

Pv 4.6 Kumāra Sutta: The Ghost Princes

What are the results of indulging in excessive sensual pleasures?

Supreme Buddha: There once was a city called Savatti located near the Himalaya Mountain. I have heard that there were two princes who lived in that city. They enjoyed sensual pleasures too much and thought only about happiness in the present life and not the future. When they died, they were reborn in the ghost […]

Categories
Theragatha

Thag 17.3 The Verses of Arahant Ānanda(1017-1055)

Famous as the one who took care of the Supreme Buddha and memorized the teachings.

1029. I received eighty-two thousand Dhammas from the Buddha, and two thousand from the liberated monks. All together I memorized eighty-four thousand Dhammas.